FAQ Memberlist Usergroups Register Log in
Profile Log in to check your private messages Search

Today: That is an EX PARROT!
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 51, 52, 53 ... 65, 66, 67  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic     Forum Index -> General Discussion
Author Message
Tinu.



Joined: 23 Mar 2008
Posts: 3690
Location: The land of dreams

PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2013 6:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good luck on the job interview, Brit!

Miho! Welcome back! *hugs* It is good to hear from you, and good luck with the study abroad program! ^___^

Tenshi wrote:

@Nem/Tinu (and perhaps Asa): The tricky thing about dopamine and seratonin are that they both do the same thing, and feeling off can be a consequence of either of them being out of balance. This is why one of the side effects of anti-depressants is "suicidal thoughts", because, you know, that's an improvement over depression, right? Razz Seriously though, pharmacological means of treatment focus on one or the other, and not both. If you overemphasise either dopamine or seratonin, keep a keen eye on your mood. If it worsens, you've picked the wrong one.

To be completely fair, proper nutrition and exercise do far more to balance neurochemistry than pharmaceuticals do. A multivitamin and jogging or running for an hour a day will have much greater effect on mood than most pharmaceuticals will, and at a fraction of the cost. We humans, no matter how you view it (evolution or creation), were not originally made to live sedentary lives. We have to play the game we were made for, and that's moving around a bit and eating a variety of things.

Well that's the tricksy thing about pills--they can really only do so much. Any doctor worth their salt won't just put a patient on pills--particularly when you're dealing with something like depression. Anti-depressants and SSRIs are notoriously hard to deal with, to find a fit with, and they rarely do any good.
Meds work best when in conjuction with some form of behavioral therapy, really. It's too bad that Western medicine is so messed up. Complementary medicine is really much better--maybe because you're looking at a patient as a person and not a collection of bones and chemicals.
/rant.

Today I got back from a mini-vacation at my grandmother's old house. Ahhh, lovely peace and quiet and rain and secret paths through pine woods. <3

Today I'm trying to set up an internship with the local paper. One of my professors was supposed to be helping me with this, but so far, she's been highly unreliable, so I am on my own. The paper doesn't even have applications. Thankfully a friend of mine made inquiries for me and things are looking promising--in that I've gotten a reply back, at least. Sigh. I feel like this is much more difficult than it should be.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tenshi



Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 2594
Location: Star Stuff

PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tinu. wrote:
Tenshi wrote:

@Nem/Tinu (and perhaps Asa): The tricky thing about dopamine and seratonin are that they both do the same thing, and feeling off can be a consequence of either of them being out of balance. This is why one of the side effects of anti-depressants is "suicidal thoughts", because, you know, that's an improvement over depression, right? Razz Seriously though, pharmacological means of treatment focus on one or the other, and not both. If you overemphasise either dopamine or seratonin, keep a keen eye on your mood. If it worsens, you've picked the wrong one.

To be completely fair, proper nutrition and exercise do far more to balance neurochemistry than pharmaceuticals do. A multivitamin and jogging or running for an hour a day will have much greater effect on mood than most pharmaceuticals will, and at a fraction of the cost. We humans, no matter how you view it (evolution or creation), were not originally made to live sedentary lives. We have to play the game we were made for, and that's moving around a bit and eating a variety of things.

Well that's the tricksy thing about pills--they can really only do so much. Any doctor worth their salt won't just put a patient on pills--particularly when you're dealing with something like depression. Anti-depressants and SSRIs are notoriously hard to deal with, to find a fit with, and they rarely do any good.
Meds work best when in conjuction with some form of behavioral therapy, really. It's too bad that Western medicine is so messed up. Complementary medicine is really much better--maybe because you're looking at a patient as a person and not a collection of bones and chemicals.
/rant.

You're hired.

We need more psychologists (and psychiatrists, and M.D.s...) who look at more holistic pictures. While it's all well and good to know the function of a system, it doesn't give you the actual picture. For instance, did you know that potassium and calcium balance your heart's function? If you have not enough of one and too much of the other, the heart muscle can actually "freeze". Now, this sounds like a good reason to start regulating bananas and milk, but the body already does that. It's called the digestive system.. Which also means that a fault in the digestive system could be causing imbalances which lead to heart problems, in theory.

As a friend told me once, "no man is an island." The same applies up and down the chart of scale. From nations to internal organs.

Today I am enjoying my classes... and now it's time to go back to them. Be well, gang!
_________________
. Dubbed "Usagi" by AsA .
Keeper of the Siderean Swords

"If by chance some day you're not feeling well, and you should remember some silly thing I've said or done, and it brings back a smile to your face or a chuckle to your heart, then my purpose as your clown has been fulfilled."
Red Skelton
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Tinu.



Joined: 23 Mar 2008
Posts: 3690
Location: The land of dreams

PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And the percentage for placebo with medications is scary high. A lot of getting well is the belief in the system of medicine you're using. Which makes psychosomatic illnesses very interesting. The mentality of a person has huge impacts on their health, and you can even classically condition the immune system--that's crazy.
For the most part, yes, the body can take care of itself. Which is why I really appreciate alternative medicines like TCM and Homeopathy, things that are based much more on the mental state of the patient or on encouraging the body's natural processes . . . .

*cough* Um. This was originally a conversation about Dopamine and Serotonin? You mentioned that they're the same thing--which they are in the sense that they're both associated with the feeling of happiness, but they're different chemicals, ultimately. They zero in on different parts of the brain, have different effects (dopamine=frontal lobe=problem solving; serotonin=(wherever memory centers are located)=memory), and are caused and/or regulated by different things.

>>;;;

Maybe I should change my major.

Today I get to do all the homework that I did not during the first half of Spring Break.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tenshi



Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 2594
Location: Star Stuff

PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tinu. wrote:
And the percentage for placebo with medications is scary high. A lot of getting well is the belief in the system of medicine you're using. Which makes psychosomatic illnesses very interesting. The mentality of a person has huge impacts on their health, and you can even classically condition the immune system--that's crazy.
For the most part, yes, the body can take care of itself. Which is why I really appreciate alternative medicines like TCM and Homeopathy, things that are based much more on the mental state of the patient or on encouraging the body's natural processes . . . .


Placebo is an interesting effect. I don't think it's even en vogue to argue that mentality doesn't play a role in health. Almost every test done, as far as I'm aware, shows that a person's goals and drive (or, in other words, their mood/mentality) play a massive role in the efficacy of treatments. That said, I don't really like Homeopathy in many cases (though not all). I don't mind it for simple things like remedies for allergies, for instance. I don't mind it for simple scrapes and cuts. It's when people try homeopathic remedies for cancer, many of the more virulent strains of disease we should well and truly have eradicated by now (smallpox, polio, scarlet fever, whooping cough, among others), or this absolutely backwards anti-medicine, anti-science way of thinking which has grown in tandem with homeopathic circles...

... >_> Uh, the "antivax" rant is probably a conversation in and of itself, and not one I should take time for. I should be writing a paper right now, actually.

Tinu. wrote:
*cough* Um. This was originally a conversation about Dopamine and Serotonin? You mentioned that they're the same thing--which they are in the sense that they're both associated with the feeling of happiness, but they're different chemicals, ultimately. They zero in on different parts of the brain, have different effects (dopamine=frontal lobe=problem solving; serotonin=(wherever memory centers are located)=memory), and are caused and/or regulated by different things.

Yep, you're correct. I believe I said that they do the same things (roughly, in terms of mood), not that they are the same things. Wink You're pretty much spot on with all of this, though. It's just that medicine only has an affect on one or the other, usually, and massive imbalances can lead to severe and/or dangerous moods. It's something to watch out for, really.

Actually, something you may find interesting, a certain method of purifying Saint John's Wort leads to a pill which, when ingested (900mg/day, I believe it was) had a 30% efficacy rate in improving mood. If you follow the data, this is comparable wth the efficacy rates of most major pharmaceuticals at the moment. Going back to the homeopathic stuff from earlier, I like this one. It's been put through scientific rigor, which is all I really ask of the stuff, in the end. @_@ Show me the standard deviation!
Stats nerd humor, I guess.

Tinu. wrote:
Maybe I should change my major.

You aren't a Psych major? O_o If not, it might work well for you. You've picked it up well.

Murr. Back to work, then. I got a grade back in my Archaeology class, and I did not do well on the midterm exam. It's only 20% of my grade, but getting any grade/marks below 90% bothers me, but I'm not even sure how to handle getting marks below 70%.

At least now I know what he's actually asking on the tests, and can do better next time.
_________________
. Dubbed "Usagi" by AsA .
Keeper of the Siderean Swords

"If by chance some day you're not feeling well, and you should remember some silly thing I've said or done, and it brings back a smile to your face or a chuckle to your heart, then my purpose as your clown has been fulfilled."
Red Skelton
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Tinu.



Joined: 23 Mar 2008
Posts: 3690
Location: The land of dreams

PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tenshi wrote:

That said, I don't really like Homeopathy in many cases (though not all). I don't mind it for simple things like remedies for allergies, for instance. I don't mind it for simple scrapes and cuts. It's when people try homeopathic remedies for cancer, many of the more virulent strains of disease we should well and truly have eradicated by now (smallpox, polio, scarlet fever, whooping cough, among others), or this absolutely backwards anti-medicine, anti-science way of thinking which has grown in tandem with homeopathic circles...

Oh I'm not arguing against biomedicine at all--I'm just saying that more holistic approaches tend to be more successful, in many cases. And I really wouldn't go so far as to say that anti-science/anti-medicine is a backwards world view at all, just a different one. You must remember, we don't know everything. As far as using homeopathic remedies and what not for serious illnesses, may I direct your attention to one Norman Cousins?



Tenshi wrote:

Actually, something you may find interesting, a certain method of purifying Saint John's Wort leads to a pill which, when ingested (900mg/day, I believe it was) had a 30% efficacy rate in improving mood. If you follow the data, this is comparable wth the efficacy rates of most major pharmaceuticals at the moment.

I did know that. It's actually considered a viable treatment for mild to moderate depression--though it's not used much in the States.

Tenshi wrote:

You aren't a Psych major? O_o If not, it might work well for you. You've picked it up well.

I should hope I've picked it up well, I've only been studying it for five years. ; )
I'm a minor, not a major, sadly. All of the numbers and statistics scared me off.

Today I try to remember what a normal, healthy eye looks like, and fail. It's hard to tell if my eye is doing something if I can't even remember what it's supposed to look like. Sigh. I guess I might just say that anything less than bright red is good.

Today I got the number for the editor of the local paper. I'm supposed to give her a call and set up my internship. Cue nervous jitters.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Asa



Joined: 10 Apr 2008
Posts: 3538
Location: Grammar Police HQ. Watch your language, I'm armed with the NYTimes Style Book AND Strunk and White!

PostPosted: Fri Mar 08, 2013 4:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Usa wrote:
Almost every test done, as far as I'm aware, shows that a person's goals and drive (or, in other words, their mood/mentality) play a massive role in the efficacy of treatments.

Which makes it very interesting to try and treat depression, in my experience... The psychiatrist gave me a prescription, and said "Go see a therapist". But he left it in my hands to track one down, and the major basis for my trouble is lack of initiative, which means it hasn't gotten done, which means I haven't really improved even with the medication. It's also frustrating because I have so much practice masking my problems that most people don't believe me when I talk about it. "Depressed people are sad and talk in a monotone." Well, no, some of them are good actors and can smile when prompted! Even the doctors - bar the psychiatrist who finally gave me drugs - fell into this classic pattern. [/fume]

On the other hand, I've sort of fallen into mutual therapy with a chavruta* of mine. We're studying an intense philosophical self-help book called "The Way of G-d", by Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzato, and it requires us to be brutally honest with ourselves. Scary and slow-going, but ultimately (if we finish it), we'll be better for it. I hope we can keep the momentum going.


Good luck, Nu!


*The definition of chavruta is a study-partner to learn Jewish texts. Over time, however, the term has also gained nuances of intimacy and friendship - to truly internalize the work, you have to open yourself up to it, and thus to your partner. Chavrutas - true study partners - have a very deep bond. That's how I feel, anyway.
_________________
Self-styled Forum Grandmother, because I hand out nicknames and hugs whether you want them or not. ^_^

Keeper of the Library and the Gateway to Haven

Nem: "It's the sort of face you just know is getting ready to poke you with something sharp."
BS: "...then insist you eat a brownie."
__________________
If we shadows have offended,
Think but this and all is mended...
Give me your hands if we be friends,
And Robin shall restore amends.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Tinu.



Joined: 23 Mar 2008
Posts: 3690
Location: The land of dreams

PostPosted: Fri Mar 08, 2013 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ohhhhh that psychiatrist makes me mad. >(
Granted, if all of the doctor's you're referencing have been in Israel that could explain why they're all giving you the same definition--the requirements to be diagnosed with a particular issue change from country to country. Depression doesn't look the same in America as it does on the other side of the Atlantic. Maybe try finding a Western doctor?

It's good that you've found someone you can talk to and are close too, as well. Never underestimate the value of friendship and social support--they're highly important to overall health. ^______^
Maybe you should try asking them, or another person you trust, if they would help you track down a therapist? That way you're not alone, and there's accountability and someone who might help keep you motivated even when you feel you can't be. Because remember, the pills will only do so much--they treat symptoms, not the source of the problem. So even if you feel better, you might still need to see someone to prevent whatever happened from happening again.
*hugs*

Today I think I'll stop hogging the Today thread. >>;;
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Claen'tor



Joined: 24 Nov 2008
Posts: 225
Location: Tennessee Tri-cities

PostPosted: Fri Mar 08, 2013 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today, I get irritated at a couple of various and sundry things, some which are in my control, and some which are not even remotely.

Those that were in my control, but I chose not to exercise it, mainly involve reasonably important things I have to do in order to not be late on my phone bill. Hard to drive to a bank to open an account when the car that would be used is owned by someone else who went to bed at 11am for some really vague and stupid reasoning and refuses to let other people drive his (not particularly stellar) vehicle. Also didn't get laundry done today, for the same reason, and I'm running out of changes of clothing.

That which is not in my control involves the IRS being the slowest responders to snail mail on the planet, and if I don't get my tax return by the end of next week, I'm not able to go to PAX. :/ I'd prefer to have had it already, but it's only been a month since I filed and mailed my taxes out (apparently it takes 3-6 weeks to process? Anyone with prior experience in this, input appreciated).

I beat Tomb Raider: Legend today, after putting it down for some 3-5 months because I got frustrated by software errors (which I finally looked up and corrected today).

Now Playing: Short Change Hero - The Heavy

This be Claen'tor, signing off.
_________________
Red is my colour. I live for it. Though it wears horribly on me. D;

I like to post my music. It's a habit. Be nice. ;_;


'People demand freedom of speech to make up for the freedom of thought which they avoid.'
-Soren Kierkegaard

Dubbed Clan by Asa
Claen'tor = Claen = Clan
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Nem



Joined: 14 Apr 2008
Posts: 2141
Location: England

PostPosted: Sat Mar 09, 2013 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

@ Tinu: Thanks for the advice. ^_^ I don't suppose there's something other than socialising that serves is there? Talking to people a lot in person makes me tired ^^;

@ Asa: Maybe you could get one of your friends, or your mother or someone you trust to set up a meeting with a therapist for you? And promise them that you're going to go (if you're big on keeping promises) so that you've got some sort of investment that'd make you go?

@ Tenshi: I'm glad to hear you've been keeping busy. ^_^; Hope things are looking up for you!

#

Today I think trying to be a better person is hard. Someone offends you and rather than turning around and tearing their guts out you've got to see whether they did it because they're insecure and find some gentle way of saying that they might not want to come across as mean as they're sounding. This isn't my skill set, my skill set's just to be unpleasant right back.

And sometimes that's even the right strategy. Do you know the legend of Pandora's box? It wasn't just some silly girl opening the thing, the way it's taught in schools. Hope was in the box too, with all the evils. And hope's one of those things that messes with you, when you think about it: if you have a generalised faculty for compassion, then you won't fight when you think that it won't do you any good - you won't try to hurt someone just for the sake of hurting them. There won't be any long 'From hell's heart I stab at thee...' things =p

You won't fight if you don't see the percentage. And how many people over the years have come to that conclusion? And hoped that by submitting they might yet prevail? -

'What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family? Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, polkers, or whatever else was at hand?'
- Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn [My emphasis]

Perhaps what the Greeks were trying to get at is that hope is something that you have to put aside when you go to fight with evil. Because you'll misjudge the situation, not really being likely to know how hard you can fight in any case, and let that doubt defeat you. Perhaps it's easier to deal with even fringe cases of people being a bit nasty if you're prepared to snap their heads off. I don't know, maybe someone's already done the work - or maybe the solution to these sorts of problems isn't something you have to think about if you've been raised to be a compassionate person (i.e. there's a strand of culture there that contains the solution to the problems.)

Problems like this at least seem like the sort of thing you should only have to solve the once.

And then maybe it's just a function of neuro-anatomy. If you buy into the lie to children that we essentially have three brains - lizard brain, monkey brain and human brain - with the former being absolute ruthless survival, followed by social functions and abstract reasoning - and that only the abstract reasoning one really has much insight into the future but has relatively little influence compared to the other two....

I don't know. I keep meaning to sit down and write a book: The nice way to power. (Or something similar. Maybe I'll call it The Fool to reference Machiavelli - a fool was one of the few people in an old court who could give free advice to a king.) with answers to this sort of problem in it. A lot of the stuff out there on how to get power and work with other people is incredibly BLAH. Doesn't seem to be a lot on how to be nice without being weak.
_________________
Never forget,
We stroll along the roof of hell
Gazing at flowers.
- Issa
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Tinu.



Joined: 23 Mar 2008
Posts: 3690
Location: The land of dreams

PostPosted: Sat Mar 09, 2013 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nem wrote:
@ Tinu: Thanks for the advice. ^_^ I don't suppose there's something other than socialising that serves is there? Talking to people a lot in person makes me tired ^^;


Wiki wrote:
Dopamine is commonly associated with the reward system of the brain, providing feelings of enjoyment and reinforcement to motivate a person to perform certain activities. Dopamine is released (particularly in areas such as the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex) by rewarding experiences such as food, sex, drugs, and neutral stimuli that become associated with them.[41] Recent studies indicate that aggression may also stimulate the release of dopamine in this way.


Nem wrote:
Doesn't seem to be a lot on how to be nice without being weak.

That's a societal problem, though, isn't it? Because we percieve being nice as being weak--not that it necessarily is.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Nem



Joined: 14 Apr 2008
Posts: 2141
Location: England

PostPosted: Sun Mar 10, 2013 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tinu. wrote:
Nem wrote:
@ Tinu: Thanks for the advice. ^_^ I don't suppose there's something other than socialising that serves is there? Talking to people a lot in person makes me tired ^^;


Wiki wrote:
Dopamine is commonly associated with the reward system of the brain, providing feelings of enjoyment and reinforcement to motivate a person to perform certain activities. Dopamine is released (particularly in areas such as the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex) by rewarding experiences such as food, sex, drugs, and neutral stimuli that become associated with them.[41] Recent studies indicate that aggression may also stimulate the release of dopamine in this way.


Ah, chocolate ice-cream it is then ^_~

Tinu. wrote:
That's a societal problem, though, isn't it? Because we percieve being nice as being weak--not that it necessarily is.


At least in influence terms if everyone perceives you as being weak, you'll find it harder to win them to your cause so that has certain implications for the strength you can swing behind you.

I agree with you that nice isn't necessarily the same as weak though. ^^

It may just be that I've not found it yet, or that the audience is niche, or that people who've made organised studies of influence have tended to have particular mindsets. Dunno.
_________________
Never forget,
We stroll along the roof of hell
Gazing at flowers.
- Issa
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Tenshi



Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 2594
Location: Star Stuff

PostPosted: Sun Mar 10, 2013 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nem wrote:
Tinu. wrote:
Nem wrote:
@ Tinu: Thanks for the advice. ^_^ I don't suppose there's something other than socialising that serves is there? Talking to people a lot in person makes me tired ^^;


Wiki wrote:
Dopamine is commonly associated with the reward system of the brain, providing feelings of enjoyment and reinforcement to motivate a person to perform certain activities. Dopamine is released (particularly in areas such as the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex) by rewarding experiences such as food, sex, drugs, and neutral stimuli that become associated with them.[41] Recent studies indicate that aggression may also stimulate the release of dopamine in this way.


Ah, chocolate ice-cream it is then ^_~

You're amusingly close to the mark. The "pleasure response" is tied to dopamine, seratonin, and endorphines, depending on what you're triggering and how. The two activities that most balance/improve mood through these neurochemicals are emotional bonding and exercise. If you can have a thoroughly enjoyable time with someone you're emotionally close to, that tends to improve your mood over a long period of time (even best friends tend to do this). Barring that, exercise is often regarded as second best.

Probably why those couples who exercise together seem so ridiculously happy...
_________________
. Dubbed "Usagi" by AsA .
Keeper of the Siderean Swords

"If by chance some day you're not feeling well, and you should remember some silly thing I've said or done, and it brings back a smile to your face or a chuckle to your heart, then my purpose as your clown has been fulfilled."
Red Skelton
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Nem



Joined: 14 Apr 2008
Posts: 2141
Location: England

PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 10:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today got an interview scheduled for later in the week ^_^

NERVOUS.

I don't know, I feel like such a kid most of the time. Like I should be a character in a comic with a bunch of stuff going on around me and "I don't know what I'm doing!!!" written above my head.

You people trust me to drive cars. You're all crazy!

It's just a confidence thing though. I know that other people aren't better drivers than me on average - and there's no reason that anyone going for an interview is likely to be any better than me.

I don't know. Realistically all that getting work would do for me is increase the amount of rent I had to pay and make me eligible to pay taxes. I'd have more disposable income but since there's nothing I want to buy *shrug* that's not really applicable. - That's another way to come at the problem I suppose, list the number of things that make getting it less of a concern.

Central gov is, supposedly, really trying to push the money angle. "Working should make people better off!" I think they're barking up the wrong tree, frankly. On the one hand they've got this back to work scheme where by you have to work for your benefits - i.e. less than minimum wage - in stores and places. So, if a company can get away with paying nothing (just remembered, gov pays benefits not the company) a month for someone from the job centre why would they pay anyone more than that, ever, for some of those roles? You're just eliminating the jobs and enslaving people in dead-end positions.

But even putting aside the fact that the conservatives are basically among the most evil governments you're likely to get in a Western democracy: When I think of the reasons I want to work, they have nothing to do with the money. They have to do with a sense of accomplishment and so on - and if you're trying to force people to work for slave-labour rates in crap jobs they're not going to get that. They'll be put off working.

People need buy-in I think. A chance of advancing towards a life that's actually worth something and to be able to see how a job fits into that as more than subsistence. Living isn't the same as being alive.

Not that there'll be too many drudge jobs around in the near future anyway, me thinks. After all, robots!

Think the thing to do is just to focus, as far as possible, on having a decent conversation. My father always said that if you do your best no-one can blame you if things go wrong. Which really strikes me as a malign ideology. Like it encourages people to try harder when they should be trying different strategies. More about excusing failure than encouraging success.

#

Also got a mechanical pencil. Discovered a while back that my writing's dramatically better in pencil.

Also been playing around with Haskell. Anyone tried that yet? It makes some really neat code. ^^

Also it snowed yesterday. Haven't been through to see if got any good photos yet. ^^;
_________________
Never forget,
We stroll along the roof of hell
Gazing at flowers.
- Issa
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Allicat



Joined: 14 Apr 2008
Posts: 1391
Location: Back in the Shire.

PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The whole back to work scheme is a massive scam and makes me angry. Did you see this article? Honestly I think it made me more angry than it should because I am a scientist and he's aiming it at my field of work, but essentially this opinion applies to everyone who's gone through the higher education system. We've worked hard to get where we are and it's quite right that we should expect that hard work to pay off.
/rant

Quote:
Not that there'll be too many drudge jobs around in the near future anyway, me thinks. After all, robots!


*giggle*

Quote:
Also got a mechanical pencil. Discovered a while back that my writing's dramatically better in pencil.


Same here, I find it much more pleasant to write in pencil too.

Today it is the most beautiful of days. The sun is blazing down trying to melt the modest amount of snow we've had over the last week. When I say modest I'm talking Norway modest, so about 6 inches Razz I've done a gas chromatography lab, been for a walk with my beloved and my shiny new camera, been to the shop and I'm about to bake some goodies for his trip home on Friday. Today is a good day ^_^
_________________
He who does not eat cheese will go mad. ~ French proverb.

Keeper of the fallen leaves. 'Cos they're still pretty.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Nem



Joined: 14 Apr 2008
Posts: 2141
Location: England

PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Allicat wrote:
The whole back to work scheme is a massive scam and makes me angry. Did you see this article? Honestly I think it made me more angry than it should because I am a scientist and he's aiming it at my field of work, but essentially this opinion applies to everyone who's gone through the higher education system. We've worked hard to get where we are and it's quite right that we should expect that hard work to pay off.
/rant


Oh my god, yeah - I did see that article.

Quote:
Commenting further on the case, Mr Duncan Smith said: "I understand she said she wasn't paid. She was paid jobseeker's allowance, by the taxpayer, to do this.


So why isn't it subject to minimum wage laws then? They're there for a reason. If you're going to call it pay.... Really. And it's not costing the company anything and >_<

It's such a lie. People have been told by their parents, their teachers and their government that this is what you do if you don't want to work a crap job, and lo and behold.... Now they turn around and go 'You suckers, you thought you wouldn't have to do this? Wrong! It was all a trick! KNOW YOUR PLACE, PLEBS.'

And as important - what nonsense. If they were as important they could withhold their labour and get the same wages as the person who actually gets to do science. But they can't. Hard to say someone's as important when they're getting paid what? Must be < 1/40th of what the other person is. Yeah, you think they're important, put your money where your mouth is.

And then they decide that they can put you to work on whatever they like, for as long as they like, in return for 50 a week. Have you read the rest of the stuff they're bringing in? Six month placements tailored to your local community's needs. Local community's needs. They're not even pretending that there's anything in it for you.

I... probably shouldn't continue though or else I'll get really wound up =p

/rant ^^;

Glad to hear you had a good day!

#

Today I'm tired. Spent a while playing around with joint locks at karate though. That's always interesting. Got to use a hammer fist (gently!) on someone's collar bone as part of blocking a hook. That's a neat trick ^_^ If you actually put it in you'd break their collarbone I suspect. In any case, I like stepping inside people's guard when you can get one of their moves off line at all.

Think I've a photo of doing it somewhere :/

Are, here we are.



If you can manage to turn your face into a sort of black soulless void while you're doing it, that's apparently quite disconcerting too Wink

Anyway, things like that are really nice when you can get away with them.

@_@ Mneh. I need sugar or something. ^^; Sunlight perhaps, where's that gone? We had like one day of it. =p
_________________
Never forget,
We stroll along the roof of hell
Gazing at flowers.
- Issa
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic     Forum Index -> General Discussion All times are GMT - 4 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 51, 52, 53 ... 65, 66, 67  Next
Page 52 of 67

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum



Elveron phpBB theme/template by Ulf Frisk and Michael Schaeffer
Copyright Ulf Frisk, Michael Schaeffer 2004


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group