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Allicat



Joined: 14 Apr 2008
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Location: Back in the Shire.

PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 1:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

American pancakes are different from British pancakes which are in turn different from crepes. As I understand it, an American pancake (or flapjack, do you guys call them flapjacks?) is thicker and uses baking powder to make it rise. A British pancake is closer to a crepe, but smaller and a slightly thicker batter.

Don't get me started on scotch pancakes or what we would call a flapjack.

Eating maple syrup with bacon and pancakes is definitely seen as a North American thing, we would more commonly eat them with lemon juice and sugar, and the Norwegians don't go for all this flat nonsense and stick to waffles.
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Tenshi



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 2:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Huh! Today I learned. Thank you Alli!

As an aside, usually I whisk the batter until it's nice and fluffy. When there are air bubbles in the batter, I know I've mixed it until it's going to be really light. Then I add the blueberries, let it settle for a minute, and add it to my warm oil in the skillet. The oil, you see, is essential. It fries the sides of the pancake as well, so that you get crispy edges all the way around.

....now I really want to make pancakes.

So, if you don't use baking soda to make the pancakes rise... what's the recipe for "British pancakes"? And, because I'm a glutton for punishment, what's the recipe for a "Scottish Flapjack"? (And yes, we usually call them pancakes. I think "flapjack" is a southern term, but I'll need Tinu. to correct me on that. I'm a yank.)
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Allicat



Joined: 14 Apr 2008
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

British pancakes (at least the way I make them ^_^):

1 egg
4 tablespoons of plain flour
milk to get the right consistency
A pinch of salt

Mix it all together and add milk until the batter is the consistency of pouring cream. Heat the pan with a nob of butter in it until the batter sizzles when you pour it in. Keep the pan moving as you pour, so the batter just covers the bottom of the pan. Once one side is cooked, flip it over and do the other side.
Serve with lemon juice and sugar.
Nom.

Quote:
...what's the recipe for a "Scottish Flapjack"?


It's scotch pancakes, like scotch tape or scotch eggs (scotch is starting to look weird) and the recipe I have is this:
50g caster sugar
100g plain flour
1 egg
Milk for consistency

Pretty much the same procedure as for normal pancakes, but you want the batter to be much thicker, about the consistency of double cream, so it doesn't spread out on the bottom of the pan. They should be about 10cm diameter. Serve these hot or cold with jam and/or butter and/or anything you want ^_^

And now for something completely different: the flapjack.

6 tablespoons golden syrup/corn syrup
200g unsalted butter
330g oats

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees C/350 degrees F and grease a large (~9" x 13"), square cake tin. Heat the butter and syrup on the stove until the butter has melted into the syrup. Put the oats in a large bowl with a pinch of salt and pour the butter/syrup mixture over it. Stir to coat all the oats. Splot this mixture into your greased tin and spread it so it covers the tin and the surface is even. Put it in the preheated oven and cook for 25 minutes until golden brown. Remove when still slightly soft, cut into squares and leave them in the tin while they cool.
Flapjacks are fantastic for hiking, as they're full of sugar so you get an instant boost and the oats give you slow release energy for later. You can add dried fruit, chocolate, nuts, pretty much anything you'd like!

I've tried to make this easy for everyone to read, but if you're confused feel free to ask what I'm on about!

I should probably make this relevant so I don't get poodled...

Today I had a very productive morning. I had work training, settled my new algae cultures in for the weekend, and imparted delicious baking knowledge ^_^
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Asa



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 9:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maple syrup tastes like heaven. Pancake syrup... doesn't.

I love pancakes. I miss pancakes. And real maple syrup. And people who don't give me funny looks when I ask for jam in my tea.

I converted my friend's brother to jam-for-tea a few years ago. I asked for it once, he gave me a funny look, I convinced him to try it, and he spent the rest of the day walking around with the jam jar, refusing to share. ^_^

Jam is also starting to look sort of silly. Scotch looks like it should be scorch.

Today my internal clock is all strange, because I stayed awake reading until 4am, and slept in until 11, and now it's 3:15pm, but it feels like 10. And I've only got a couple of hours to get my act in gear for Shabbat.
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Allicat



Joined: 14 Apr 2008
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have heard of jam-for-tea, but since I like my tea without sugar I've never tried it. I imagine a fragrant black tea with jam would be quite pleasant though.

Hehe, I have a lovely mental image of your brother hoarding his jam now ^_^ (although since I don't know what he looks like, I have substituted your brother for Denmark)
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Asa



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, you're not far wrong... He does sort of look like that. And that's kind of what it looked like. He got very snappish and possessive. ^_^

It's best with chamomile, for when you're sick. I like to use cherry preserves, because it leaves fruit pieces behind and I love cherry.

My friend's brother.
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BS: "...then insist you eat a brownie."
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Allicat



Joined: 14 Apr 2008
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oop, sorry I misread!

I'm not a fan of chamomile tea at all, but it might be nicer with jam? I can give it a try anyway ^_^
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Maeniel



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today, I found a one-man Phantom of the Opera medley.
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Tinu.



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tenshi wrote:
(And yes, we usually call them pancakes. I think "flapjack" is a southern term, but I'll need Tinu. to correct me on that. I'm a yank.)

In the Southern US they are called Pancakes. And they're actually not a terribly common breakfast food. More common than waffles, certainly, but generally if people are going to have starches for breakfast they go for grits.

I was always under the impression that "flapjack" was a western term? And that it wasn't quite the same thing as a pancake.

[quote=Wiki says]A flapjack is a thick small pancake, generally around 10 cm in diameter. Flapjacks are often served in a stack with syrup and butter, which can be accompanied by bacon. The terms pancake and flapjack are often confused and today in the US are nearly synonymous. The Oxford English Dictionary records the word flapjack as being used as early as the beginning of the 17th century, referring to a flat tart or pan-cake./quote]

Also, on a similar subject, wiki has an article on regional vocabularies in the US. Pretty accurate for my region. Except "to throw" is listed as "Chunk" and it's actually "Chuck."

Jam-for-tea? That sounds . . . interesting. I might have to try that.

Maen: That is brilliant.

Today I picked up some heat pads for my knees this weekend. They've gotten better, so I think I must have just pulled something. They still twinge on occasion, though--hence the heat pads and the bottle of ibuprofen I'll be keeping on me during this weekend's festival.

This week a friend of mine finally talked me into watching Doctor Who. There goes all of my free time for a few months.
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Allicat



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 4:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nu, what are grits?! I have never had a satisfactory explanation.

Maen, that put the icing on an awesome day for me ^_^
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Tenshi



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Allicat wrote:
I have heard of jam-for-tea, but since I like my tea without sugar I've never tried it. I imagine a fragrant black tea with jam would be quite pleasant though.


Asa had me try it a few years back, and I can report that it is amazing with both Earl Grey and English Breakfast. Also, Britland had me try Lady Grey (I believe it is), which, with a bit of blackberry jam, is... divine. If you like semi-sweet things. I also like my tea without sugar, so maybe this will be up your alley, no? (If you caught that pun, I apologize for how terrible it was.)

@Maen: That's pretty amazing. o_o As with everyone else, that... thank you!

Asa wrote:
Maple syrup tastes like heaven. Pancake syrup... doesn't.

See... there's someone who gets it. Pancake syrup is basically corn syrup, I think. Maple syrup actually comes out of maple trees, and is the equivalent of liquid gold crossed with emulsified ambrosia.

@Tinu: As always, West Virginia is pretty much the stepchild of the US. We're not technically in the "Mid Atlantic" (and our speech doesn't reflect that area either), but we don't speak or get accepted into "The South". Meh...

@Alli: I will be cooking tomorrow. Pancakes! (I'd help with grits, but I have no idea what they actually are.)
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"If by chance some day you're not feeling well, and you should remember some silly thing I've said or done, and it brings back a smile to your face or a chuckle to your heart, then my purpose as your clown has been fulfilled."
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Tinu.



Joined: 23 Mar 2008
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Allicat wrote:
Nu, what are grits?! I have never had a satisfactory explanation.

The easiest answer to that question is ground corn.

You boil it (them?) in water until it reaches a thick/semi-thick consistency and forms a sort of porridge, and then you eat it with butter and salt--and cheese sometimes.

It's like the inverse of oatmeal, actually.

Usa: Well, West Virginia is not part of the South because you all sided with the Union in the Civil war (which is still, as far as I'm aware, how these things are judged--at least in the South--the Mason Dixon line is irrelevant. Maryland is not Southern, I don't care what your degree is), but you've still got the flavor of the South, so the northern states don't claim you either. WV has always been an oddly independent state. I can appreciate that.
I would say that the easiest answer is that WV is Mountain. It's like the embodiment of the Appalachians all stuffed into one place. Maybe? I've never been there. Hear it's lovely, though.

If it helps, Virginia is in a similar boat.

Tenshi wrote:


Asa wrote:
Maple syrup tastes like heaven. Pancake syrup... doesn't.

See... there's someone who gets it. Pancake syrup is basically corn syrup, I think. Maple syrup actually comes out of maple trees, and is the equivalent of liquid gold crossed with emulsified ambrosia.

Oh. Never realized pancake syrup wasn't maple syrup before. That explains quite a lot, actually. Once you pointed out that there was a difference I immediately remembered the impostors.

Yes. Maple syrup is delicious. Pancake syrup is nasty. It tastes like . . . Sweet oil, almost. No real flavor. Maple, on the other hand . . . yum.

And Maple syrup doesn't come straight from the trees as syrup. You have to make it. When I was a kid we used to have something . . . sap or extract or something and we'd make our own. That was the best I've had, to this day, I think.
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Tenshi



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tinu. wrote:
Usa: Well, West Virginia is not part of the South because you all sided with the Union in the Civil war (which is still, as far as I'm aware, how these things are judged--at least in the South--the Mason Dixon line is irrelevant. Maryland is not Southern, I don't care what your degree is), but you've still got the flavor of the South, so the northern states don't claim you either. WV has always been an oddly independent state. I can appreciate that.
I would say that the easiest answer is that WV is Mountain. It's like the embodiment of the Appalachians all stuffed into one place. Maybe? I've never been there. Hear it's lovely, though.


<3

Anyone showing love to WV is a-okay in my book, and you're right. West Virginia may be about a decade behind the rest of the US in terms of technological advancements (and about 30 years behind most major cities, amusingly), but the people here have never lost their kindness. During the massive storm (a "Derecho", for those interested) that wiped out power to most of the Mid-Atlantic region, people who were nearly stranded often found that the locals would feed them, give them water, and help them with whatever gasoline they had stored. They asked for nothing in return.

Also, the scenery here is just mindbogglingly gorgeous. I'm struck by it every day, and I've grown up here...

Tinu. wrote:
If it helps, Virginia is in a similar boat.


*glower* We are not near Roanoke..
Kidding! I get that soooooooo often, though... "Is that near Roanoke?" *mutter*
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. Dubbed "Usagi" by AsA .
Keeper of the Siderean Swords

"If by chance some day you're not feeling well, and you should remember some silly thing I've said or done, and it brings back a smile to your face or a chuckle to your heart, then my purpose as your clown has been fulfilled."
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Tinu.



Joined: 23 Mar 2008
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tenshi wrote:


*glower* We are not near Roanoke..
Kidding! I get that soooooooo often, though... "Is that near Roanoke?" *mutter*

Roanoke? . . .OH. There's a Roanoke Virginia, too, isn't there?

There's a Roanoke NC (there are two, actually). Itty bitty island. Whole colony vanished into thin air on it, way back when. =B

Ha. Weeeeell WV is a little close to Roanoke VA, if you look at Google Maps. Closer than it is to some things, anyways.

Well, don't feel bad. People are bad with geography. Especially Americans. Wink
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Asa



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2012 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

People keep asking me if I live close to New York City, just because I'm sort of from the Eastern half of the States, and I try to explain that no, I'm actually from a place more than six hours away from New York, and they wave it away with, "Well, it's closer than California, right?"

-_-

You'd think that people from a country the size of New Jersey would think all places are further apart in the States, but no, they seem to think it's the same size, and travel times are the same.
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Keeper of the Library and the Gateway to Haven

Nem: "It's the sort of face you just know is getting ready to poke you with something sharp."
BS: "...then insist you eat a brownie."
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